For everything, there is a (liturgical) season

U.S. Catholic

With a history that stretches across millennia, our faith is a repository of wisdom on what it means to live: To walk this Earth is to wait and prepare, to embrace humility, to welcome the stranger, to mess up and try again, to suffer, to speak our truth, to sorrow, and to be in community. As the liturgical year systematically invites us to reflect on how we are doing as humans—Are we practicing courage? Living with openness to the spirit? Extending mercy and forgiveness?—it ensures that we aren’t just stumbling from one phase of human development to the next. The liturgical year, if embraced as a life curriculum, helps us to actually develop, living not just any life but a good life.

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Cheers! How to Say Grace, Give a Toast, and Offer a Blessing

Amendo

Grace before meals, toasts, and birthday blessings are opportunities to bring a crowd together, to bestow affirmation and to remind everyone present of what matters most in life. So next time you find yourself with a group of family members or friends and the opportunity to give thanks, to celebrate, or to bless presents itself, go for it! Your words will infuse the room — and the people in it — with warmth, joy and love.

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Can I skip my friend’s wedding because of COVID?

U.S. Catholic

Q: COVID wedding? My friend is getting married this season, and I’m nervous about attending due to COVID-19. I’m supposed to be a bridesmaid. The bride and groom have indicated that guests are welcome to take any precautions that they are comfortable with but that nothing will be enforced—which means some guests might not wear masks. I have an immunocompromised parent who I help care for, so I’m nervous about attending. But I’m also worried about hurting my friendship with the bride by not going. How should I handle this?

—Bridesmaid Blunders

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To find the holy in everyday life, remember ‘God is not remote from us’

U.S. Catholic

To remain open to the idea that our everyday experiences can be religious experiences is central to our identity as Catholics. It’s called sacramentality, and it rests on the message of the incarnation: God dwells among us and can be seen, touched, and heard in the context of human living. Every tangible element of creation, from the natural environment to human persons, provides an opportunity to encounter God’s presence. As the great Jesuit paleontologist Pierre Teilhard de Chardin wrote: “God is not remote from us. He is at the point of my pen, my pick, my paintbrush, my needle—and my heart and my thoughts.”

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Festivity Infusion: 3 Strategies for Making Weekends Fun During Quarantine

Amendo

The past few months have revealed to me that I need out-of-the-ordinary forms of fun to make my weekends and evenings feel satisfying and full. Many of my usual sources of enjoyment are no longer available to me, but that doesn’t mean that I’m destined to a life that feels like one, long midweek afternoon. Here are three ways that I’ve started to infuse my evening and weekends with festivity.

Read more at Amendo.